Count On Us Challenge: Congratulations to Kender School!

Kender School in Lewisham are the winners of the Mayor’s Fund for London’s Count On Us Challenge.

Val from the Maths Zone takes on Johnny Ball

Val takes on Johnny Ball!

Very well done to them and very well done to all of the schools who took part. The grand final took place yesterday at City Hall with 13 schools who had won their way through heats and semi finals to compete at solving 24®Game puzzle cards. Each card has four numbers; you can add, subtract, multiply or divide in any combination, but you must use all four numbers to make 24.

It is quite astonishing to see pupils in years 4 and 5 (aged 8 to 10) able to solve these puzzles almost instantaneously. Their teachers certainly can’t, my PGCE students with top maths degrees can’t. So how is it done?

I talked with Bob Sun, inventor of the 24®Game in Easton, Pennsylvania and he gave me a copy of a book by journalist Daniel Coyle called The Talent Code. Coyle examines a series of instances in which exceptional performance is found in different fields and looks at the elements that came together to produce it. A great coach is always included, so teachers, you know you are important! However, the coming together of real desire and serious hard work with lots and lots of practice are the principle elements. In the end, the final few percent are achieved through an intangible element that can be called ‘talent’. But, for sure these kids can beat there teachers because they have worked hard at it.

Now, playing the 24®game is not like memorising your times tables. It involves flexibility of mind. You generate a whole raft of relationships which make up parts of the 24, like looking for 8 and 3 or 6 and 4, or 23 and 1 made up of pairs or triples of the numbers available. So, you are juggling lots of combinations. The outcome is young people who see numbers and are aren’t interested in seeing if they can remember the answer, but recognise the need to fiddle with what they’ve got to unlock routes to the answer. You can’t get more like true mathematical thinking than that in a 9 year old!

So, the Count On Us Challenge provides the desire. Compete for your school, win the prize, get to walk across the top of Tower Bridge. It doesn’t matter, it was a great day out for everyone, but everyone involved was ready to compete because they cared and they’d worked hard at it. Net result, 100s of young people with much better and more flexible number skills than their teachers. That’s good!

All of the 24®Game sets are only available from The Maths Zone. There are class kits, tournament packs, the competition standard one and two digit sets, primer sets for early practice and tougher sets for advanced challenges. 

There will be a Count on Us Challenge next year. So, start practising now. The kids from Kender School are very good. Very good indeed. They will take some beating! (And please don’t think it is a school with any special advantage, not at all, it is a very straightforward urban primary in SE London. They work hard at it and their kids practise and my are they sharp with their number skills. Well done to them.

We have produced a guide to help you run a number challenge tournament in your school or your area. You can use the 24®Game cards as they do in the Count On Us Challenge. If you want a more equally weighted tournament, we also have SuperTMatik, which is a card game from Portugal where they have a National (and World!) championship, but the problems are seeded so you can have pupil’s competing at different levels in the same game. Target Set 3 CMYKFinally there is Target Maths, where the numbers are combined to make a different target each time. Try this one (the target number is in the middle).

So, an in-school tournament to provide the desire, then plenty of opportunities to practice, practice and young people get really good. And then in secondary school what happens? They forget, because they stop practising. What does Andy Murray do before during and after every tournament? He practices hard. That’s why he is so good (and he may just have a bit of that extra few percent too!). It was humbling to see how good the kids from Kender (and indeed all of the other schools) are. Teachers can get all of their kids to that level with enough desire and a lot of practice. Good luck for next year!

 

 

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The MathsZone Course Boxes

We’ve been very busy at The MathsZone. Feedback from schools suggested they really love our gifted and talented courses Illuminate and Wondermaths, but they already have some of the materials that come with them. So, we’ve done a major re-design. Still the same fantastic courses for your gifted and talented students at key stage 2 (Wondermaths) or key stage 3 (Illuminate), but now in a neat plastic storage box, which will go on your book shelves. Each one has a comprehensive teacher guide detailing the structure and purpose of all of the sessions, with commentary and solutions (where appropriate!). For the students we have organised the materials into a beautiful student workbook. Now your students can keep all of their work in a really attractive book which they keep at the end of the course. Game cards, dice and counters are included for the activities.

There are fewer puzzles directly referenced in the course, so the price is lower, but of course you can buy all of the puzzles separately to extend the activities. Illuminate comes with a CD Rom with all of the course materials and additional materials for projection. Wondermaths has an associated web site with the materials available. When you are ready to run the course for a second time, you can get extra sets of 10 copies of the workbooks. The key objective for the teacher is to get up and running with the minimum of fuss, so you can focus on supporting your students explore their mathematics.

The aim of both course is to give students the opportunity to explore mathematics. Wondermaths has games, to compare strategies, puzzles to develop sustained thinking and investigational maths top explore maths language and move towards explanation and proof. Illuminate aims to develop the ideas of pure mathematics for those who are limited by the algorithmic nature of school exam courses. Students will develop and compare proofs, while exploring the nature of proof itself. Their is a comprehensive section on group theory, fully accessible to ordinary school students. Games strategies are developed and compared and the course ends with a project in fractal geometry. These are really course in the mathematics that mathematicians would recognise.

Playing Maths Games Makes You Do Better at School!

OK, so I came to this by being responsible for public maths events for maths year 2000. We had 22 shopping centre events, at the end of January 2001, where we set up staffed table stands with maths activities. It was humbling to see ordinary shoppers give up on Sainsburys and spend the day doing maths puzzles and games. So, the I end up being a part time shop keeper selling maths games and puzzles. It is just great to keep being reminded that people love doing this stuff. Continue reading

Making it ‘Real’

As owners of a games shop we are honour bound to play games at Christmas! No really, we do love them. So, Val, Katie (13) and I played a game of Risk. Now Risk is not so PC overall but, well, when you have made an alliance with the mass armies (in this case of the evil of middle earth) and they have attacked your opponent on your behalf and your turn comes round and you now realise you can renege on your agreement and wipe them out … well that is tough. Emotion, scruples, morality all bound up in tough decision making. Now I think you really (up to a point seriously) do have to debrief after a game like that, but is sure is that you are in the situation making the decisions … a history lesson for sure but not just discussing the issues cold. Continue reading

Assessment

I had an interesting conversation with a former maths teacher who was telling me how much she disliked ‘investigations’. She said that you could never tell whether a student had done the work themselves or if their Dad had done it for them. It was clear to me that steering the conversation round to wondering about the difference between investigating mathematically and submitting GCSE coursework, wasn’t going to get me anywhere, so I had to nod and force a polite smile. On one level it was deeply depressing how pleased maths teachers were when GCSE coursework was abandoned for maths exams. On the other, the whole process had been so discredited … Continue reading

Maths Events

I was asked to run a session for PGCE students using a kit of parts we make called Maths-for-a-Day. Basically, we took the content of the kits I had produced for the shopping centre events I organised during Maths Year 2000 and packaged them up in a box suitable for a school maths event. I asked for 6 volunteers from the group to staff the activities and the remainder were punters. Continue reading

Maths Puzzles: Sustaining Activity

At higher level GCSE, it is possible to get a grade B having got 60% of the paper wrong. Since this is the benchmark for moving on to an A level course, there could be a concern that students could decide, say to avoid learning algebra and concentrate on geometry and statistics in order to get the B (or vice versa). In the main, the questions that they choose will have one or two steps at most to a solution, or if more are needed then guidance will be offered in the form of question structuring. In these circumstances, more extended A level questions, where the mathematics required may cover more than one area, would prove a significant culture shock. Continue reading